What’s Working in School Counseling In Ohio? Clinical – Educational Implications for Success

School Counseling Programs

What’s Working in School Counseling In Ohio? Learn Clinical & Educational Implications for Success

The impact of school counseling programs are significant, but often undocumented and under reported. This presentation explains how to organize school counseling programs based on priorities for greater results that benefit students both clinically and educationally. See the results of what one school counselor did last year to hit the issue head on with documented results for students when she used the Grow With Guidance System. Visit our website and see the PPT Presentation and important information for your school.

OCA-OCSA Presentation 11-2013 [.pdf] 2.3 MB

What’s Working in School Counseling In Ohio? Learn Clinical & Educational Implications for Success

AOCC 2013 Conference Hilton Columbus at Easton Town Center

November 7, 2013

If you have additional questions:

Dr. Tommie Radd, Counselor, Columbus City Schools, Columbus, OH, can be reached at her home office:
Phone: 614-795-1373
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]
Web site: www.allsucceed.com

Dr. Doris Coy, Consultant, can be reached via email at:
Email: [email protected]

Personal, social, emotional and behavioral skills are the only constant in every situation. The level of development of those skills determines if one will respond or react over time. !!!! – Tommie R. Radd, PhD

What’s Working in School Counseling in Ohio?

Clinical and Educational Implications for Success.

The Agenda :

  1. Introduction
  2. Framework of Standards, Benchmarks, Indicators, Evaluation Used: CANA, ITS, Student Survey
  3. An Overview of Guidance System Components and Assessment/Evaluation
  4. System Components:
    1. Behavior Management (extrinsic)
    2. Self-Talk/Self Pictures (intrinsic)
    3. Curriculum (student skills)
    4. Implementation (staff skills)
    5. Family Involvement
    6. Observation/Evaluation
  5. Guidance System Checklist and Place in the Classroom – Life Lab
  6. Pre/Post Instrument Information/Results and Student Feedback
  7. Educational and Clinical Implications
  8. Questions & Closing

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How do standards, benchmarks, indicators, and performance observation/evaluation strategies become the foundation of a performance-based system?

The standards, benchmarks, indicators, and performance observation/evaluation strategies provide the framework for developmental feedback and evidence. This framework is the base for accountability. After the framework is established, clarity of purpose can be communicated to all populations in the schooling process.

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Overview of a School Counseling Programs Guidance System

  • Behavior Management – Extrinsic – what we say and do
  • Self-Talk & Self-Pictures – Intrinsic – what we say and believe with what we think and feel
  • Curriculum – Student Skills
  • Implementation – Staff Skills
  • Family Involvement – Family Skills
  • Observation/Evaluation

System Components Implemented

  • Congruent
  • Systemic – identify all components of the System or whole and understand the relationship between components
  • Slowly and simultaneously
  • 3-5 year process
  • The Whole is larger than the sum of the parts

The whole is equal to more than the sum of its parts. —Tommie R. Radd, Ph.D.

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Life Lab

A way of defining the classroom as a simulation in which students, pre-K-12 and beyond, learn, experience, and apply the essential skills needed for life; the comprehensive developmental guidance system creates a life lab in every classroom through which students develop a conscious and intentional frame of reference that can be applied throughout life.

Assessments Used

  1. Children’s Affect Needs Assessment (CANA) Pre/Post (self, other awareness, self control, decision making/problem solving, group cooperation)
  2. Invitational Teaching Survey (ITS) Pre/Post (personally inviting – commitment, consideration, professionally inviting – coordination, proficiency, expectation)
  3. Student Survey– Qualitative Post (Grow With Guidance System Manual page 186) Sixty-seven students from the program completed evaluations NOTE: Most “NO” responses stated that they knew the skill already

Children’s Affect Needs Assessment (CANA)

A 42-question diagnostic curriculum assessment taken by students that provides student input into their classroom guidance curriculum activity selection; a diagnostic tool to involve students and create a sense of student ownership for guidance skill implementation and change (Note: ownership occurs when students “own” a problem and admit, recognize, and acknowledge personal needs and challenges that support assuming responsibility and commitment for change); assessment questions asked in the five essential learning strands of the curriculum of The Grow With Guidance® System; one way to observe and evaluate change at the end of the school year through pre-post assessment; the student curriculum assessment included in The Grow With Guidance® System.

Invitational Teaching Survey (ITS)

A 43-question diagnostic class climate assessment, taken by students, which gives student input about their classroom experience and whether they have a feeling of being “invited”; a diagnostic tool to involve students and get their input on ways to improve climate and school relationships; one indicator of ways to support staff growth experiences and plans; one way to observe and evaluate change at the end of a school year through pre-post assessment; the school climate assessment included in The Grow With Guidance® System.

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Student Feedback

GWG Student Self-Reflection Summary

  1. Have the GWG activities helped you? 100% yes Examples of feedback: People are nice to me and they like me; I liked it when Mrs. Overstreet came in and taught us. {MANY SAID}; I liked Grow With Guidance {MANY SAID}; I like I statements; I use self-talk. {MANY SAID}; I try to think before I say things. {MANY SAID}; Now we work in groups and help each other; Student _is nice to me now. She plays with me at recess.; Mrs._ tells us not to leave anyone out; They don’t call each other names or anything now; If somebody drops something somebody might help them pick it up.; My teacher calls on me; “I only see 1 student who does not (respect others) hardly ever.”
  2. Do you feel better about yourself? 93% (63 yes/ 4 no) Examples of feedback: I feel happy more. {MANY SAID}; I say how I feel; People like me; I want to be different; I don’t want to be the same as everybody.; Because I do good in math; Because people never come up and ask me to play.; Because my friends are mean to me on the bus.; I am comfortable in my class.; “I’m not scared to ask questions anymore because I’m only a kid so far.”; Because today a 5th grader was being mean to a kindergartener and I didn’t know what to do.
  3. Do you feel better about learning? 88% ( 59 yes/ 8 no) Examples of feedback: Learning is fun; I already liked to learn.; Like when we do games I don’t have fun sometimes.; I don’t like homework; I just want to play my video games.; It is important for me to learn so I can reach my goals.; Because teacher _ takes his/her time to help me.; Because sometimes we do things in groups; Now we work in groups and help each other.
  4. Do you get along better with others? 91% (61 yes/ 5 no) Examples of feedback: I got along with people before the same; I use selftalk before I make people mad. {MANY SAID}; I tell them good things and they tell me good things back.; They play with me and give me hugs.; Because I am kind to them like we are supposed to be.; They let me play with them at recess.; People share with me.; People are nice to me and they like me.; Student _is nice to me. She lets me sit by her on the bus.; We let each other use our stuff and I have friends.; People boss me around too much.; Student _ is mean to almost everyone all the time.; Sometimes they are mean and sometimes they are not.; Student _ is mean to me if I don’t play a game right.; “They like my friend and don’t want to have anything to do with me only her and they are mean to me.”; “Some people still don’t let me play at recess and are only kind when they want something.; They still boss me around and make fun of me.”; I just want people to have manners and ask people to do something.; Some people are still mean behind other people’s back.
  5. Can you handle problems better? 91% (61 yes/ 5 no) Examples of feedback: .I use self-talk before I do things to handle problems.; I think about how they feel first; I handled problems before the same except I didn’t think about it so much; I think about how they would feel first; I don’t just do the first thing I think.
  6. Do you get along better with your teacher? 55% (37 yes /30 no) Examples of feedback: I always like my teacher; I get along with all my teachers.; My teacher does things we can’t do; My teacher should do self talk before he/she yells so much.; All the teachers like kids; My teacher knows that I like: Baseball, Football, Video games; I know they care but they have lots of kids; A lot of students are nice to the teachers because the teachers are nice to them.; Because teacher _ takes his/her time to help me.; Because I don’t ever get a classroom job.; Because he is the one helping you so you can succeed.; No one talks back to her anymore.; Because teachers work hard; Because they let us do fun things.; Because they let us play games.; I have a great teacher! ; “Some people still whine or talk mad at the teacher, but not as much as they used to.”; Some people lie to the teachers.; If I’m proud of a paper, I put it in a bin and (s)he will hang it up.; Because sometimes we are slow and (s)he gets mad.; Because sometimes kids get checkmarks and (s)he is not happy.; (One student wrote the same thing and added, “and he blows his top!”)

Implications – Educational and Clinical

  1. Students/professionals develop their foundation skills frame of reference in the personal, emotional, behavioral and social domains (PEBS)
  2. Students develop foundation skills needed to apply to areas of challenge such as bullying, academic achievement, career, etc.
  3. Behavioral and skill framework to determine those students with clinical needs from those students with behavioral issues.
  4. Prevention skills needed to keep students safe so they can respond and not react to life challenges in a positive way.
  5. School/classroom climate more inviting and consistent between the walk and talk expected for positive relationships- supports educators with self-concept theory and perceptual psychology framework.
  6. Core Skills needed in all areas of growth over the lifespan in the stands of self, other awareness, self-control, decision making/problem solving, group cooperation, academic and career.
  7. Relationships improved and empowered between Teacher – Student, Student-Student and Professional-Professional.
  8. Positive attitudes about personal growth, a willingness to use strategies needed to confront issues across the life span and an openness to mental health.

References

Radd, T. R. (2014). Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Second Edition. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-58-2

Radd, T. R. (2014). Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-61-2

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance System Manual Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-53-7 (1-878317-53-9).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Manual Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-59-9

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Primary Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-54-4 (1-878317-54-7).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance Primary Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-60-5

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Intermediate Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-55-1 (1-878317-55-5).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Intermediate Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317- 62-8

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Middle School Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-56-8 (1-878317-56-3).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance Middle School Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-63-6

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance High School Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-57-5 (1-878317-57-1)

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance High School Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-64-4

Radd, T. R. (2006). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals Pre-K–12 & Beyond Vol. I. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-45-8

Radd, T. R. (2014). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Vol I. Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-65-2

Radd, T. R. (2006). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals Pre-K–12 & Beyond Vol. II Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-46-6

Radd, T. R. (2014). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Vol II Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-65-

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Music: G. G. Raddbearie Sings, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-68-7

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Music: G.G. Raddbearie Sings. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-47-6 (1-878317-47-4).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Fun Game Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-67-9

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System F.U.N. Game, Second Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-49-0 (1-878317-49-0)

Radd, T. R. (2006). The History, Development, and Research of the Educational Systems Model: The Grow With Guidance® System. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-52-0 (1-878317-52-0).

A complete Research Report is available here

 

School Counseling Programs

This presentation explains how to organize school counseling programs, prioritizing greater results that benefit students both clinically and educationally.