Sandy Hook Remembered

Sandy Hook Remembered

The tragedy that traumatized our country, the shooting at Sandy Hook Elementary School, left us overwhelmed. As many of us have said – ENOUGH! We recently experienced the tragedy at Chardon and just this week there was another shooting. The list goes on and keeps growing! Seeing continued school violence, abuse, and death is a call to action. It is important to remember the critical part we play. No program or approach can claim to be the answer to this problem, but based on my research and experience, I am convinced that there is a great deal more that can and needs to be done. I CHALLENGE YOU TO JOIN ME NOW TO DO IT!

Sandy Hook Remembered [.pdf] 61.0KB
Check Yourself Out [.pdf] 41.0KB
Checklist for Assessment [.pdf] 104.5KB

Sandy Hook Remembered

Are you relieved that we are finally having the broader conversation about this challenge as a country? Many factors contribute to this multilayered and complex issue. Instead of listing what needs to be done by other, my choice is to contribute to the dialogue while working to support change within my profession.

Meeting this challenge needs to be more than a crisis plan, crisis counseling, and memorial services. They are essential, but not enough to realistically meet this issue head-on. I am convinced that we need to focus on what Grow With Guidance offers now more than ever.

The Grow With Guidance System offers over 24 formulas to address dynamics at play in the layers of this crisis including:

  1. General Challenges
  2. Student Skill Development
  3. Student Self-Destructive Behaviors
  4. Student Destructive Behaviors Toward Others

The foundation of each formula includes the Grow With Guidance System. This System focuses on teaching and developing the personal, emotional, behavioral, and social skills (PEBS) in an inviting environment with positive relationships. Accountability, assessment, and evaluation are woven throughout based on specific standards, benchmarks, and indicators. When a comprehensive, developmental guidance system is in place, we are proactive in laying the components necessary for prevention while establishing our ability to respond and not just react when a tragedy occurs.

Check Yourself Out. See how many YES responses you have. The greater number or YES responses, the greater your level of pro-action and prevention.

  1. Do you teach basic personal, emotional, behavioral, and social skills (PEBS) to all students K-12?
  2. Do your students learn the 21st Century Skill scaffolding developmentally, K-12.
  3. Does staff support, participate, and implement those skills taught?
  4. Do you include self-talk, self-picture, relaxation, brain integration, and sensory activities for all students?
  5. Do you have a positive behavior plan for all students?
  6. Does your staff participate in personal and professional growth plans?
  7. Do you include family involvement in the process?
  8. Do you have an inviting school climate plan?
  9. Do you evaluate and use diagnostic assessments to guide your student (PEBS) skill progress every year?
  10. Do you prioritize working with the Whole student?
  11. Do you avoid being focused on academics and testing to the detriment of empowering the whole student?
  12. Do you prioritize your professional time working with all students, staff, and families?
  13. Do you have a reasonable ratio of school ADM to professional in your school district and school?
  14. Do you have an identified resource network for community connections and support?

Check Yourself Out. The Classroom Group Guidance System Checklist is another way you can assess and evaluate your program for pro-action and prevention.

Checklist for Assessment [.pdf] 104.5KB

REMEMBER:

Personal, social, emotional and behavioral skills are the only constant in every situation. The level of development of those skills determines if one will respond or react over time. —Tommie R. Radd, PhD

Reference: Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World

Role of Self-Concept in School Climate and Career Readiness

Role of Self Concept

What’s the Role of Self-Concept in School Climate and Career Readiness?

The role of self-concept is often overlooked or ignored as positive school climate and career readiness programs are developed. Learn about the essential missing link of self-concept in this workshop. The self-concept series and weave process is explained in detail with implications and implementation for your school counseling community. You can count on us to help you put everything in this PPT in place within your school counseling program!

AOCC 2015 [.pdf] 2.8 MB

Role of Self Concept

AOCC 2015 Conference Hilton Columbus at Easton Town Center November 5, 2015

If you have additional questions:

Dr. Tommie Radd, Counselor, Columbus City Schools, Columbus, OH, can be reached at her home office: Phone: 614-795-1373 Email: [email protected] or [email protected] Web site: www.allsucceed.com

Dr. Doris Coy, Consultant, can be reached via email at: Email: [email protected]

The self-concept a person develops becomes the guiding light to show him and others the way he sees himseif. All people need to understand that they are worth working for, growing for, and developing their spirit, purpose and potential for. – Tommie R. Radd, PhD

What’s the Role of Self-Concept in School Climate and Career Readiness?

Agenda

  1. Introduction
  2. The Overview of ASCA Standards, NCDA Crosswalk, and School Counseling Program
  3. An Overview of the Guidance System and System Components
  4. The Heart of the Real Classroom, Life Lab, and Career Readiness Discussed
  5. The Role of Self-Concept and the Self-Concept Energizer
  6. The Self-Concept Series and Weave
  7. Ways of using the SCS in the Guidance System and School Counseling Program
  8. The Impact of the Self-Concept Process on Climate and Career Readiness
  9. Participant Brainstorm for Implementation of SCS.
  10. Questions & Closing

Role of Self Concept 3

Role of Self Concept 4

Role of Self Concept 5

Role of Self Concept 6

Overview of a Guidance System

  • Behavior Management – Extrinsic – what we say and do
  • Self-Talk & Self-Pictures – Intrinsic – what we say and believe with what we think and feel
  • Curriculum – Student Skills • Implementation – Staff Skills •
  • Family Involvement – Family Skills
  • Observation/Evaluation

System Components Implemented

  • Congruent
  • Systemic – identify all components of the System or whole and understand the relationship between components
  • Slowly and simultaneously
  • 3-5 year process
  • The Whole is larger than the sum of the parts

The whole is equal to more than the sum of its parts. —Tommie R. Radd, Ph.D.

Classroom Group Guidance System Checklist

    • Positive Behavior Plan
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Behavior
      3. Five Star Class Meetings
      4. Class Responsibilities and Guidelines
      5. Problem Solving – “Help” vs “Hurt”
      6. Effective Behavior Interactions
      7. Problem Ownership
      8. Cooperative Strategies
      9. Contracts
      10. Peer Group Work
      11. The Five C’s for Maintaining Conflict
      12. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      13. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Plan
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Self-Talk/Self-Pictures
      3. Activity Process General Self-Talk
      4. Activity Process Specific Self-Talk
      5. Activity Process General Self-Pictures
      6. Activity Process Specific Self-Pictures
      7. Incorporate Relaxation
      8. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      9. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Curriculum Plan
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Student Skills
      3. Begin Core Activities
      4. CANA (Children’s Affect Needs Assessment) Administered
      5. ITS (Invitational Teaching Survey) Administered
      6. Florida Key Administered
      7. CANA Pre Report
      8. ITS Pre Report
      9. Florida Key Pre Report
      10. Selective Activities
      11. Format Implemented for all Activities
      12. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      13. Post CANA, Post ITS, and Post Florida Key Tests Administered
      14. CANA, ITS, and Florida Key Post Reports
      15. Report summary written including all year-end performance Observation/Evaluation information
      16. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Staff Improvement Skills
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Staff
      3. Overview of the System
      4. Overview of Behavior Management Component
      5. Overview of Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Component
      6. Overview of Staff Implementation Skills
      7. Overview of Curriculum Component
      8. Conduct Staff Needs Assessment
      9. Prioritize Staff Skills
      10. Encouragement Strategies
      11. Prioritize Group Techniques
      12. Prioritize Other Needs Based on the ITS and Needs Assessment
      13. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      14. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Family Involvement
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Family
      3. Overview of the System
      4. Overview of Behavior Management Component
      5. Overview of Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Component
      6. Overview of Staff Implementation Skills
      7. Overview of Student Curriculum Component
      8. Conduct Family Needs Assessment
      9. Prioritize Skills from Behavior Management Component
      10. Prioritize Skills from Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Management Component
      11. Prioritize Skills from Staff Implementation Skills
      12. Prioritize Skills from Curricular Core and Other Skills
      13. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      14. Increase Component Implementation Annually

It is recommended that all system information be included for families when possible.

  • Developed a 3-to-5 year plan in the components for simultaneous, slow implementation
  1. Behavior Management
  2. Self-Talk/Self-Pictures
  3. Curriculum
  4. Implementation Skills
  5. Family Involvement

Behavior Management

Role of Self Concept

Life Lab

A way of defining the classroom as a simulation in which students, pre-K-12 and beyond, learn, experience, and apply the essential skills needed for life; the comprehensive developmental guidance system creates a life lab in every classroom through which students develop a conscious and intentional frame of reference that can be applied throughout life.

Role of Self Concept

Suggested Elementary Counselor Time Allocations

  1. Foundation: 40%
  2. Counseling Groups: 30%
  3. Individual Counseling: 10%
  4. All Others: 20%

Suggested Middle/JR. High School Counselor Time Allocations

  1. Foundation: 35-30%
  2. Counseling Groups: 30-35%
  3. Individual Counseling: 10%
  4. All Others: 25%

Suggested High School Counselor Time Allocations

  1. Foundation: 30-25%
  2. Counseling Groups: 30-35%
  3. Individual Counseling: 10%
  4. All Others: 25-35%

Self-Concept Series Energizer

  • Hi. My name is _______________.
  • I am valuable because there is no one else like me in the world.
  • One thing about me is ________________________.

Self-Concept Series

  1. All are special and valuable no matter what they think, say, do, or feel. TRUTH
  2. All show they are remembering that all are valuable by making helpful vs. hurtful choices toward self and others. BEHAVIOR
  3. I am responsible. ACCOUNTABILITY

Also included in Counseling Children, 11th Edition by Henderson and Thompson, Chapter 6

Weave

  • Use of Language – help & hurt in place of: good, bad, should, right, wrong, ought, must
  • Relate to behaviors as you see them
  • Reframe language into helpful and hurtful
  • Integrate into music

Inviting Yourself With Self Talk and Self Pictures

Role of Self Concept Page

Role of Self Concept Page

Get Started – Start Now

  • List 3 ways you can begin the SCS-Weave in your program and school.
  • Explain ways that addition supports an inviting climate and career readiness.

References

Radd, T. R. (2014). Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Second Edition. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-58-2

Radd, T. R. (2014). Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-61-2

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance System Manual Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-53-7 (1-878317-53-9).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Manual Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-59-9

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Primary Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-54-4 (1-878317-54-7).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance Primary Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-60-5

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Intermediate Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-55-1 (1-878317-55-5).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Intermediate Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317- 62-8

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Middle School Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-56-8 (1-878317-56-3).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance Middle School Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-63-6

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance High School Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-57-5 (1-878317-57-1)

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance High School Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-64-4 References (Continued)

Radd, T. R. (2006). Classroom Activites for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals Pre-K–12 & Beyond Vol. I. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-45-8

Radd, T. R. (2014). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Vol I. Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-65-2

Radd, T. R. (2006). Classroom Activites for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals Pre-K–12 & Beyond Vol. II Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-46-6

Radd, T. R. (2014). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Vol II Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-65-

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Music: G. G. Raddbearie Sings, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-68-7

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Music: G.G. Raddbearie Sings. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-47-6 (1-878317-47-4).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Fun Game Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-67-9

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System F.U.N. Game, Second Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-49-0 (1-878317-49-0)

Radd, T. R. (2006). The History, Development, and Research of the Educational Systems Model: The Grow With Guidance® System. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-52-0 (1-878317-52-0).

A complete Research Report is available here.

 

What’s Working in School Counseling In Ohio? Clinical – Educational Implications for Success

School Counseling Programs

What’s Working in School Counseling In Ohio? Learn Clinical & Educational Implications for Success

The impact of school counseling programs are significant, but often undocumented and under reported. This presentation explains how to organize school counseling programs based on priorities for greater results that benefit students both clinically and educationally. See the results of what one school counselor did last year to hit the issue head on with documented results for students when she used the Grow With Guidance System. Visit our website and see the PPT Presentation and important information for your school.

OCA-OCSA Presentation 11-2013 [.pdf] 2.3 MB

What’s Working in School Counseling In Ohio? Learn Clinical & Educational Implications for Success

AOCC 2013 Conference Hilton Columbus at Easton Town Center

November 7, 2013

If you have additional questions:

Dr. Tommie Radd, Counselor, Columbus City Schools, Columbus, OH, can be reached at her home office:
Phone: 614-795-1373
Email: [email protected] or [email protected]
Web site: www.allsucceed.com

Dr. Doris Coy, Consultant, can be reached via email at:
Email: [email protected]

Personal, social, emotional and behavioral skills are the only constant in every situation. The level of development of those skills determines if one will respond or react over time. !!!! – Tommie R. Radd, PhD

What’s Working in School Counseling in Ohio?

Clinical and Educational Implications for Success.

The Agenda :

  1. Introduction
  2. Framework of Standards, Benchmarks, Indicators, Evaluation Used: CANA, ITS, Student Survey
  3. An Overview of Guidance System Components and Assessment/Evaluation
  4. System Components:
    1. Behavior Management (extrinsic)
    2. Self-Talk/Self Pictures (intrinsic)
    3. Curriculum (student skills)
    4. Implementation (staff skills)
    5. Family Involvement
    6. Observation/Evaluation
  5. Guidance System Checklist and Place in the Classroom – Life Lab
  6. Pre/Post Instrument Information/Results and Student Feedback
  7. Educational and Clinical Implications
  8. Questions & Closing

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 3

How do standards, benchmarks, indicators, and performance observation/evaluation strategies become the foundation of a performance-based system?

The standards, benchmarks, indicators, and performance observation/evaluation strategies provide the framework for developmental feedback and evidence. This framework is the base for accountability. After the framework is established, clarity of purpose can be communicated to all populations in the schooling process.

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 5

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 6

Overview of a School Counseling Programs Guidance System

  • Behavior Management – Extrinsic – what we say and do
  • Self-Talk & Self-Pictures – Intrinsic – what we say and believe with what we think and feel
  • Curriculum – Student Skills
  • Implementation – Staff Skills
  • Family Involvement – Family Skills
  • Observation/Evaluation

System Components Implemented

  • Congruent
  • Systemic – identify all components of the System or whole and understand the relationship between components
  • Slowly and simultaneously
  • 3-5 year process
  • The Whole is larger than the sum of the parts

The whole is equal to more than the sum of its parts. —Tommie R. Radd, Ph.D.

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 10

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 11

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 12

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 13

Life Lab

A way of defining the classroom as a simulation in which students, pre-K-12 and beyond, learn, experience, and apply the essential skills needed for life; the comprehensive developmental guidance system creates a life lab in every classroom through which students develop a conscious and intentional frame of reference that can be applied throughout life.

Assessments Used

  1. Children’s Affect Needs Assessment (CANA) Pre/Post (self, other awareness, self control, decision making/problem solving, group cooperation)
  2. Invitational Teaching Survey (ITS) Pre/Post (personally inviting – commitment, consideration, professionally inviting – coordination, proficiency, expectation)
  3. Student Survey– Qualitative Post (Grow With Guidance System Manual page 186) Sixty-seven students from the program completed evaluations NOTE: Most “NO” responses stated that they knew the skill already

Children’s Affect Needs Assessment (CANA)

A 42-question diagnostic curriculum assessment taken by students that provides student input into their classroom guidance curriculum activity selection; a diagnostic tool to involve students and create a sense of student ownership for guidance skill implementation and change (Note: ownership occurs when students “own” a problem and admit, recognize, and acknowledge personal needs and challenges that support assuming responsibility and commitment for change); assessment questions asked in the five essential learning strands of the curriculum of The Grow With Guidance® System; one way to observe and evaluate change at the end of the school year through pre-post assessment; the student curriculum assessment included in The Grow With Guidance® System.

Invitational Teaching Survey (ITS)

A 43-question diagnostic class climate assessment, taken by students, which gives student input about their classroom experience and whether they have a feeling of being “invited”; a diagnostic tool to involve students and get their input on ways to improve climate and school relationships; one indicator of ways to support staff growth experiences and plans; one way to observe and evaluate change at the end of a school year through pre-post assessment; the school climate assessment included in The Grow With Guidance® System.

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 18

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 19

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 20

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 21

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 22

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 23

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 24

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 25

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 26

School Counseling Programs presentation 2011-2013 page 27

Student Feedback

GWG Student Self-Reflection Summary

  1. Have the GWG activities helped you? 100% yes Examples of feedback: People are nice to me and they like me; I liked it when Mrs. Overstreet came in and taught us. {MANY SAID}; I liked Grow With Guidance {MANY SAID}; I like I statements; I use self-talk. {MANY SAID}; I try to think before I say things. {MANY SAID}; Now we work in groups and help each other; Student _is nice to me now. She plays with me at recess.; Mrs._ tells us not to leave anyone out; They don’t call each other names or anything now; If somebody drops something somebody might help them pick it up.; My teacher calls on me; “I only see 1 student who does not (respect others) hardly ever.”
  2. Do you feel better about yourself? 93% (63 yes/ 4 no) Examples of feedback: I feel happy more. {MANY SAID}; I say how I feel; People like me; I want to be different; I don’t want to be the same as everybody.; Because I do good in math; Because people never come up and ask me to play.; Because my friends are mean to me on the bus.; I am comfortable in my class.; “I’m not scared to ask questions anymore because I’m only a kid so far.”; Because today a 5th grader was being mean to a kindergartener and I didn’t know what to do.
  3. Do you feel better about learning? 88% ( 59 yes/ 8 no) Examples of feedback: Learning is fun; I already liked to learn.; Like when we do games I don’t have fun sometimes.; I don’t like homework; I just want to play my video games.; It is important for me to learn so I can reach my goals.; Because teacher _ takes his/her time to help me.; Because sometimes we do things in groups; Now we work in groups and help each other.
  4. Do you get along better with others? 91% (61 yes/ 5 no) Examples of feedback: I got along with people before the same; I use selftalk before I make people mad. {MANY SAID}; I tell them good things and they tell me good things back.; They play with me and give me hugs.; Because I am kind to them like we are supposed to be.; They let me play with them at recess.; People share with me.; People are nice to me and they like me.; Student _is nice to me. She lets me sit by her on the bus.; We let each other use our stuff and I have friends.; People boss me around too much.; Student _ is mean to almost everyone all the time.; Sometimes they are mean and sometimes they are not.; Student _ is mean to me if I don’t play a game right.; “They like my friend and don’t want to have anything to do with me only her and they are mean to me.”; “Some people still don’t let me play at recess and are only kind when they want something.; They still boss me around and make fun of me.”; I just want people to have manners and ask people to do something.; Some people are still mean behind other people’s back.
  5. Can you handle problems better? 91% (61 yes/ 5 no) Examples of feedback: .I use self-talk before I do things to handle problems.; I think about how they feel first; I handled problems before the same except I didn’t think about it so much; I think about how they would feel first; I don’t just do the first thing I think.
  6. Do you get along better with your teacher? 55% (37 yes /30 no) Examples of feedback: I always like my teacher; I get along with all my teachers.; My teacher does things we can’t do; My teacher should do self talk before he/she yells so much.; All the teachers like kids; My teacher knows that I like: Baseball, Football, Video games; I know they care but they have lots of kids; A lot of students are nice to the teachers because the teachers are nice to them.; Because teacher _ takes his/her time to help me.; Because I don’t ever get a classroom job.; Because he is the one helping you so you can succeed.; No one talks back to her anymore.; Because teachers work hard; Because they let us do fun things.; Because they let us play games.; I have a great teacher! ; “Some people still whine or talk mad at the teacher, but not as much as they used to.”; Some people lie to the teachers.; If I’m proud of a paper, I put it in a bin and (s)he will hang it up.; Because sometimes we are slow and (s)he gets mad.; Because sometimes kids get checkmarks and (s)he is not happy.; (One student wrote the same thing and added, “and he blows his top!”)

Implications – Educational and Clinical

  1. Students/professionals develop their foundation skills frame of reference in the personal, emotional, behavioral and social domains (PEBS)
  2. Students develop foundation skills needed to apply to areas of challenge such as bullying, academic achievement, career, etc.
  3. Behavioral and skill framework to determine those students with clinical needs from those students with behavioral issues.
  4. Prevention skills needed to keep students safe so they can respond and not react to life challenges in a positive way.
  5. School/classroom climate more inviting and consistent between the walk and talk expected for positive relationships- supports educators with self-concept theory and perceptual psychology framework.
  6. Core Skills needed in all areas of growth over the lifespan in the stands of self, other awareness, self-control, decision making/problem solving, group cooperation, academic and career.
  7. Relationships improved and empowered between Teacher – Student, Student-Student and Professional-Professional.
  8. Positive attitudes about personal growth, a willingness to use strategies needed to confront issues across the life span and an openness to mental health.

References

Radd, T. R. (2014). Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Second Edition. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-58-2

Radd, T. R. (2014). Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-61-2

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance System Manual Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-53-7 (1-878317-53-9).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Manual Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-59-9

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Primary Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-54-4 (1-878317-54-7).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance Primary Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-60-5

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Intermediate Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-55-1 (1-878317-55-5).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Intermediate Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317- 62-8

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance Middle School Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-56-8 (1-878317-56-3).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance Middle School Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-63-6

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance High School Level Third Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-57-5 (1-878317-57-1)

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance High School Level Third Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-64-4

Radd, T. R. (2006). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals Pre-K–12 & Beyond Vol. I. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-45-8

Radd, T. R. (2014). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Vol I. Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-65-2

Radd, T. R. (2006). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals Pre-K–12 & Beyond Vol. II Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-46-6

Radd, T. R. (2014). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals: Pre-K-12 & Beyond Vol II Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 1-878317-65-

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Music: G. G. Raddbearie Sings, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-68-7

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Music: G.G. Raddbearie Sings. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-47-6 (1-878317-47-4).

Radd, T. R. (2014). The Grow With Guidance System Fun Game Second Edition, e-book. Columbus, Ohio: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-67-9

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System F.U.N. Game, Second Edition. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. ISBN: 978-1-878317-49-0 (1-878317-49-0)

Radd, T. R. (2006). The History, Development, and Research of the Educational Systems Model: The Grow With Guidance® System. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-52-0 (1-878317-52-0).

A complete Research Report is available here

 

School Counseling Programs

This presentation explains how to organize school counseling programs, prioritizing greater results that benefit students both clinically and educationally.

Strong Finish – New Beginning

Strong Finish – New Beginning

Social Emotional Learning

Strong Finish-New Beginning [.pdf] 97.2KB

GWG Research Summary [.pdf] 106.5KB  This summary provides a short overview of our comprehensive research report. You can count on us to support your success! Social Emotional Learning
The History, Development, and Research of the Educational Systems Model: The Grow With Guidance System [.pdf] This comprehensive report includes 2 longitudinal studies of over ten years plus many shorter studies, both national and international.

Make a difference for your entire school community by using Grow With Guidance. Remember the impact of Grow With Guidance and Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Programs on academic achievement and other challenges we face.

The Grow With Guidance System research and other research sources are powerful tools for communicating the impact of adding GWG to your plans for next school year. We are here to assist you in your program planning and grant applications that include Grow With Guidance. You can count on us to support your success!

Strong Finish-New Beginning to find the links and information for:

  • The GWG Research Research Summary
  • Download for the 35-year GWG Research Report
  • Federal Grant Opportunity Due in May 2012
  • SEL Research Report

Strong Finish – New Beginning

The complete SEL Research Report and Federal Grant Opportunity Due in May 2012 information follows. Please keep us informed of your progress!

Social Emotional Learning Research that documents the impact on learning gains: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01564.x/full

The Impact of Enhancing Students’ Social and Emotional Learning: A MetaAnalysis of School-Based Universal Interventions Joseph A. Durlak1 , Roger P. Weissberg2 , Allison B. Dymnicki 3 , Rebecca D. Taylor 3 , Kriston B. Schellinger 4

This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 213 school-based, universal social and emotional learning (SEL) programs involving 270,034 kindergarten through high school students. Compared to controls, SEL participants demonstrated significantly improved social and emotional skills, attitudes, behavior, and academic performance that reflected an 11-percentilepoint gain in achievement. School teaching staff successfully conducted SEL programs. The use of four recommended practices for developing skills and the presence of implementation problems moderated program outcomes. The findings add to the growing empirical evidence regarding the positive impact of SEL programs. Policymakers, educators, and the public can contribute to healthy development of children by supporting the incorporation of evidence-based SEL programming into standard educational practice.

Federal Grant Opportunity Due in May 2012

The information needed for Grant application is:

The U.S. Department of Education is requesting applications for new fiscal year (FY) 2012 grants under the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program (ESSCP). The purpose of ESSCP is to support efforts by local educational agencies (LEAs) to establish or expand elementary school and secondary school counseling programs. The deadline for submitting applications is 4:30 pm eastern time on May 25, 2012.

The Federal Register announcement regarding ESSCP grant applications is at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-10/pdf/2012-8616.pdf. The electronic grant application should be posted soon on the http://www.grants.gov website. (According to the Federal Register notice, the ESSCP announcement can be found by clicking on “Grant Search” in the right-hand column, and entering “84.125” in the “Search by CFDA Number” box; this doesn’t appear to be working yet, however.)

Grant awards will be between $250,000-$400,000 per year, usually for three years, and the Department expects to award a total of over $21 million in grants. Grants must supplement—not supplant—other federal, state, or local funds used for providing school-based counseling and mental health services to students. Absolute priorities for the grants are to:

  1. Establish or expand counseling programs in elementary schools, secondary schools, or both; and
  2. Enable more data-based decision-making, especially in improving instructional practices, policies, and student outcomes in elementary and secondary schools.

The Federal Register notice states that when considering making awards in FY 2012 and subsequent years from the list of unfunded applicants, the Department of Education will award competitive preference priority points for

  • projects serving students residing on Indian lands;
  • projects serving students enrolled in persistently lowest-achieving schools; and
  • projects designed to address the needs of military-connected students. Projects can only seek competitive preference priority points for one priority area.

Anyone considering applying for an ESSCP grant should read the Federal Register notice; additional information on the program is at the Department of Education’s webpage at http://www.ed.gov/programs/elseccounseling/applicant.html. Grant applications can also be obtained a copy from the Education Publicans Center (EDPubs) by calling toll free 1–877–433–7827. (If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call 1–877–576–7734. (If contacting ED Pubs, be sure to identify the program by CFDA number 84.215E.)

For more information, contact:

American Counseling Association (ACA) Scott Barstow | Director, Public Policy and Legislation ph 703-823-9800 x234 | 800-347-6647 x234fx 703-823-0252 | web counseling.org

 

Strong Finish – New Beginning [Social Emotional Learning]

School Counselor Evaluation

Dear Fellow Professionals,

Many states are requiring a new School Counselor Evaluation Process based on the American School Counselor Association (ASCA) School Counseling Standards. See this presentation about this new Ohio School Counselor Evaluation process to:

  1. Assist you in learning ways to support improved school counseling programs.
  2. Learn ASCA recommendations for a quality school counseling program
  3. Determine how school counselors can have a fair evaluation process based on district requirements that are not aligned with ASCA recommendation.

We can customize programing on this topic for you via consultation and training.
Our goal is to support you to implement a quality and fair and growth focused evaluation process for all professionals

LIKE US on Facebook for additional information and specials!

Looking forward to working together,
The Grow With Guidance Team

How to Get Your Principal On Board with the New Evaluation and Advocate for Yourself

How to Get Your Principal On Board with the New Evaluation and Advocate for Yourself

Standards-based Evaluation Process

How to Get Your Principal On Board with the New Evaluation and Advocate for Yourself

School Counselors need to understand how to create a fair evaluation process that is based on the State Standards. This presentation is based on the Ohio School Counselor Standards and can be used as an example for a way to use a standards-based evaluation process. Many existing roles and requirements for school counselors include priorities that are not congruent with the ASCA and State standards. This presentation shows how to use the self-assessment and evaluation process to drive program priorities and advocate for a developmental, preventive school counseling program needed for student success. This workshop was used for a Lunch and Learn program at the AOCC 2016 Conference Hilton Columbus at Easton Town Center on November 3, 2016.

[Download] File Size 1MB

Contact information for additional questions:

 

Tommie Radd, PhD, LPC, NSCC, NBCC,CRC: Consultant

 

Doris Coy, PhD, LPCS, NCC, NCCC: Consultant

“A person’s behavior teaches more about what that person believes than any statement of beliefs.” – Tommie R. Radd, Ph.D

Agenda

  1. Introduction
  2. An Overview of the Ohio School Counselor Standards, Ohio School Counselor Evaluation Model and the School Counselor Evaluation Framework
  3. Reviewing the Ohio School Counselor Self-Assessment
  4. Aligning what you do with what is effective – NON SCHOOL COUNSELOR DUTIES?
  5. Negotiating your plan for a fair evaluation process
  6. The Impact of following the Standards on your school/district mission.
  7. Establish a workable schedule and timeline to meet your goals.
  8. Q and A

Ohio School Counselor Standards
Ohio School Counselor Standards

Ohio School Counselor Evaluation Model
Ohio School Counselor Evaluation Model

Section II. Six Ohio Standards for School Counselors and Evaluation Process

Comprehensive School Counseling Program Plan
School counselors collaboratively envision a plan for a comprehensive school counseling program that is developmental, preventative and responsive, and in alignment with the school’s goals and mission.

    • Standard 2:

Direct Services for Academic, Career and Social/Emotional Development
School counselors develop a curriculum, offer individual student planning and deliver responsive services in order to assist students in developing and applying knowledge, skills and mindsets for academic, career and social/emotional development.

Standard 3:

Indirect Services:
Partnerships and Referrals School counselors collaborate and consult with school personnel, parents/guardians, community partners and agencies/organizations to coordinate support for all students.

Standard 4:

Evaluation and Data
School counselors collaboratively engage in a cycle of continuous improvement using data to identify needs, plan and implement programs, evaluate impact and adjust accordingly.

Standard 5:

Leadership and Advocacy
School counselors lead school efforts and advocate for policies and practices that support an equitable, safe, inclusive and positive learning environment for all students.

Standard 6:

Professional Responsibility,
Knowledge and Growth School counselors adhere to the ethical standards of the profession, engage in ongoing professional learning and refine their work through reflection.

Standard 1. Comprehensive School Counseling Program Plan

School counselors collaboratively envision a plan for a comprehensive school counseling program that is developmental, preventative and responsive, and in alignment with the school’s goals and mission.

Narrative Summary:

A comprehensive school counseling program is an integral part of an effective school, serving to meet the academic, career and social/emotional development needs of all students. To be effective for each and every student in the school
community, the program must be data-based, developmental, systematic and comprehensive. To lead the development of the comprehensive school counseling program, school counselors must know the effective practices in their field and be familiar with the expectations described by experts in the field, such as the work of the American School Counselor Association.

Elements:

  • 1.1 School counselors possess the knowledge and skills to design a comprehensive and proactive school counseling program.
  • 1.2 School counselors collaborate to design the school counseling program.
  • 1.3 School counselors take leadership in identifying resources for the school counseling program.
  • 1.4 The school counseling program aligns with the school’s goals and mission.

Standard 1. Comprehensive School Counseling Program Plan

School counselors collaboratively envision a plan for a comprehensive school counseling program that is developmental, preventative and responsive, and in alignment with the school’s goals and mission.

Standard 1 Elements Indicators 1.1
School counselors possess the knowledge and skills to design a comprehensive
and proactive school counseling program.

  • a. The comprehensive plan includes clearly stated program priorities, student improvement goals, proactive and preventive strategies, and a data-informed cycle of evaluation.
  • b. The comprehensive plan includes a school counseling core curriculum that includes sequenced activities based on students’ academic, career and social/emotional development.
  • c. The comprehensive plan is responsive, prepared with services to intervene on behalf of students at risk (educationally, socially, or emotionally) or in times of crisis.
  • d. The comprehensive plan includes an individual planning system, in which counselors work with students to set flexible goals tailored to students’ individual educational, career, social/emotional development and aspirations.
  • e. The comprehensive plan promotes connections and collaborations among teachers, staff, parents/guardians and community partners.
  • f. School counselors use technology in planning the comprehensive school counseling program, and the plan employs technology to deliver services and meet student needs.
  • 1.2 School counselors collaborate to design the
    school counseling program.
  • a. School counselors collaborate with key stakeholders to set the goals, priorities, organization and implementation strategies for the comprehensive school counseling program.
  • b. School counselors communicate the goals of the program with students, school personnel, parents/guardians and community partners.
  • 1.3 School counselors take leadership in identifying
    resources for the school counseling program.
  • a. School counselors identify roles and responsibilities of stakeholders in managing and implementing the comprehensive school counseling program.
  • b. School counselors collaborate to identify resources (time, money, school staff, community partners) and manage resources to implement the plan.
  • 1.4 The school counseling program aligns with the school’s goals and mission.
  • a. School counselors can communicate the integral relationship of the school counseling program with the total educational program.
  • b. School counselors can articulate how the plan aligns to initiatives at the federal, state and local level and aligns to state, district and building goals and activities.

Standard 2. Direct Services for Academic, Career and Social/Emotional Development

School counselors develop a curriculum, offer individual student planning and deliver responsive services in order to assist students in developing and applying knowledge, skills and mindsets for academic, career and
social/emotional development.

Narrative Summary:

School counselors work with students to promote academic, career and social/emotional learning and well-being. School counselors provide direct services for students to help them build knowledge, skills and mindsets in order to set goals, solve problems and reason through complex choices related to their academic, career and social/emotional development. School counselors purposefully employ a variety of approaches to implement the comprehensive school counseling program and provide direct services to students. These may include individual and group counseling; one-on-one meetings; group lessons; classroom presentations or assemblies; integrated or stand-alone lessons; parent/guardian and family education; and other approaches. Effective school counselors build on students’ strengths, while helping them identify and manage their challenges.

Elements:

  • 2.1 Curriculum Development: School counselors possess the knowledge and skills to develop an effective school counseling core curriculum.
  • 2.2 Individual Student Planning: School counselors work directly with students to support their academic
    progress and goals.
    2.3 Individual Student Planning: School counselors work directly with students to develop their college and
    career-related knowledge, skills and pathways.
    2.4 Individual Student Planning: School counselors work directly with students to support their social/emotional
    development, skills and mindsets.
    2.5 Responsive Services: School counselors develop appropriate interventions for students as needed.
    Ohio Standards for School Counselors 12
    Standard 2. Direct Services for Academic, Career and Social/Emotional Development
    School counselors develop a curriculum, offer individual student planning and deliver
    responsive services in order to assist students in developing and applying knowledge,
    skills and mindsets for academic, career and social/emotional development.
    Standard 2 Elements Indicators 2.1
    Curriculum Development:
    School counselors possess
    the knowledge and skills to
    develop an effective school
    counseling core curriculum.
    a. School counselors demonstrate knowledge of accepted theories and effective
    techniques of developmental school counseling.
    b. School counselors understand student development and
    developmental characteristics.
    c. School counselors recognize environmental factors that influence
    students’ development.
    d. School counselors understand various exceptionalities and populations of students.
    e. School counselors use student standards to drive the delivery of direct services
    to students.
    f. School counselors can clearly articulate a rationale for their decisions.
    2.2
    Individual Student Planning:
    School counselors work
    directly with students to
    support their academic
    progress and goals.
    a. School counselors plan and deliver effective activities and experiences designed to
    enhance student learning and achievement.
    b. School counselors possess deep knowledge of the school academic program in order
    to help students make appropriate academic decisions.
    c. School counselors counsel students, in collaboration with parents/guardians, to set
    academic goals.
    2.3
    Individual Student Planning:
    School counselors work
    directly with students to
    develop their college and
    career-related knowledge,
    skills and pathways.
    a. School counselors provide developmentally appropriate counseling designed to
    build students’ awareness of, skills for and navigation through varied college and
    career opportunities.
    b. (As appropriate on a developmental continuum) School counselors possess and clearly
    communicate knowledge of educational options (P-12 and postsecondary), including
    flexible credit options, and opportunities to earn Ohio college credit.
    c. (As appropriate on a developmental continuum) School counselors possess and clearly
    communicate knowledge of Ohio-specific career counseling resources.
    d. School counselors employ technology effectively to help students explore college and
    career interests and opportunities.
    Ohio Standards for School Counselors 13
    Standard 2. Direct Services for Academic, Career and Social/Emotional Development,
    Cont.
    School counselors develop a curriculum, offer individual student planning and deliver
    responsive services in order to assist students in developing and applying knowledge, skills
    and mindsets for academic, career and social/emotional development.
    Standard 2 Elements Indicators 2.4
    Individual Student Planning:
    School counselors work
    directly with students
    to support their social/
    emotional development,
    skills and mindsets.
    a. School counselors observe and assess students’ social/emotional development
    and skills.
    b. School counselors plan and deliver effective activities and experiences to promote
    wellness and help students develop the character traits and self-awareness
    needed for success.
    2.5
    Responsive Services:
    School counselors develop
    appropriate interventions
    for students as needed.
    a. School counselors monitor student progress related to academic, career and
    social/emotional development.
    b. School counselors implement and/or recommend interventions for students as
    needed, including academic and behavior interventions and supports.
    c. School counselors are trained in crisis response, and articulate and provide an
    appropriate role in a plan for intervening quickly and systematically in response to
    a trauma or crisis.
    Ohio Standards for School Counselors 14
    Standard 3. Indirect Services: Partnerships and Referrals
    School counselors collaborate and consult with school personnel, parents/guardians, community partners and
    agencies/organizations to coordinate support for all students.
    Narrative Summary:
    School counselors recognize that educating students is a shared responsibility, involving students, school personnel, parents/
    guardians and the community. To this end, counselors provide indirect services on behalf of students by fostering open
    communication and collaboration among the school, home and community in order to promote and build trust, understanding
    and partnerships. School counselors seek solutions and provide referrals to meet students’ academic, career and social/
    emotional development needs.
    Elements:
    3.1 School counselors partner with school personnel and parents/guardians to achieve common goals for student success.
    3.2 School counselors coordinate school and community resources and provide referrals as needed to support students and
    promote their success.
    Standard 3. Indirect Services: Partnerships and Referrals
    School counselors collaborate and consult with school personnel, parents/guardians,
    community partners and agencies/organizations to coordinate support for all students.
    Standard 3 Elements Indicators 3.1
    School counselors partner with
    school personnel and parents/
    guardians to achieve common goals
    for student success.
    a. School counselors involve parents/guardians in students’ academic, career and
    social/emotional development.
    b. School counselors provide clear, relevant and appropriate information for
    students and their parents/guardians.
    c. School counselors facilitate communication between students, parent/guardians
    and school personnel, and encourage school personnel involvement in working
    with families to support students.
    d. School counselors demonstrate skills in teamwork, communication and
    problem-solving when providing indirect services on behalf of students.
  • Ohio School Counselor Evaluation Model

Evaluation Framework for School Counselors

School Counselor Evaluation Rubric

Standard Six Metrics of Student Outcomes

    • OSCES Page 30

Standard Six Metrics of Student Outcomes

Required School Counselor Evaluation Components

Ohio School Counselor Self Assessment on Standards

  • Appendix E – Pages 34 through 37
  • Ohio School Counselor Evaluation Model

The Reality of Your Work

List What You DO  and Indicate Aligning Standard

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

Percent of Your Work that DOES NOT Align to Standards?

Indicate:

  1. What you discovered that does not align.
  2. The percentage of your time spent doing it.

Negotiating a FAIR Evaluation Process

  • Discuss aligning what you do with what is evaluated
  • Caution of owning the Student Metric – Examples of factors that can affect your results

Sample Measurement Tools for Metric(s) of Student Outcomes

What is Your School/District Mission

  • What is your School and School District mission statement?
  • How do the School Counselor Standards align with your School District Mission?

Establish a Workable Timeline to Meet Your Goals

  • Negotiate your schedule and time needed to meet your goals. Identify those responsibilities that keep you on and off track during the school year.

School Counselor Professional Growth Plan

School Counselor Improvement Plan

  • Appendix – Pages 39 and 40
  • Ohio School Counselor Evaluation Model

Informal Observation: Open-Ended Form

Pre and Post Observation Questions

Formal and Information Observations

Improvement Plan: Evaluation of Plan

Ohio School Counselor Summative Evaluation Rating

  • Appendix K Page 45 and definition page 46
  • Ohio School Counselor Evaluation Model

Brainstorm Strategies for a Fair Process

  • What are things you can do to determine the best way to have a fair process for you to advocate for yourself?
  • Example: Meet to discuss the process in advance and determine who is the person to evaluate you.

Barriers to Progress

  • Legislative requirements.
  • How many counselors are required in you school district.
  • Non-Counseling Responsibilities
  • Flexibility on the interpretation of what goes into the standards.
  • Counselors’ hesitancy to speak up in the process.
  • Untrained evaluators

Additional Ohio Information

Daniel Sipek – Ohio Department of Education

Ohio Revised Code

Standards-based state framework for evalua4on of school counselors.

http://codes.ohio.gov/orc/3319.113

ASCA Information

National Board for Professional Teaching Standards

standards-based evaluation process