Teaching and Counseling in Today’s World Second Edition

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Creating the Climate and Culture Needed for Successful Response to Intervention – A Systems Approach

Creating the Climate and Culture Needed for Successful Response to Intervention – A Systems Approach.

This presentation demonstrates ways that a Guidance Systems approach creates an inviting school climate while effectively meeting the learning needs for all students with an RTI process that works. Participants will learn about the System and RTI while exploring ways the System supports the whole child’s development in an inviting climate and culture. The impact of Social Emotional Learning Programs is documented by recent research to increase academic achievement test scores by up to 11 percentile points. Contact us with questions and comments.

Grow With Guidance RTI Presentation [.pdf] 17.3MB

Creating the Climate and Culture Needed for Successful Response to Intervention – A Systems Approach

Agenda

  1. Introduction
  2. An Overview of Guidance System Components – Key to an Inviting Classroom
  3. System Components
    1. Behavior Management (extrinsic)
    2. Self-Talk/Self Pictures (intrinsic)
    3. Curriculum (student skills)
    4. Implementation (staff skills)
    5. Family Involvement
    6. Observation/Evaluation
  4. Life Labs – The Heart of the Real Classroom
  5. The Invitational Education Formula
  6. RTI Definition and Pyramid
  7. Questions & Closing

We can create true democratic classrooms that insist ALL students be accountable and responsible. School environments need to be examples of democracy in action. – Tommie R. Radd, PhD

Remember: The impact of Social Emotional Learning Programs is documented by recent research to increase academic achievement test scores by up to 11 percentile points. The Systems approach demonstrates ways to create an inviting school climate while effectively meeting the learning needs for all students with an RTI process that addresses the needs of the whole child.

Personal, social, emotional and behavioral skills are the only constant in every situation. The level of development of those skills determines if one will respond or react over time. —Tommie R. Radd, PhD

core skills for all components and essential learning domain standards

The whole is equal to more than the sum of its parts. ~ Tommie R. Radd, PhD

observation evaluation family involvement

A comprehensive, developmental guidance system for classrooms and schools with the necessary components for success. Each component is implemented slowly and simultaneously with a 3- to 5-year plan until all system components are in place.

observation evaluation family-involvement

The interactive, interrelated, and interdependent movement between system components.

Overview of a Guidance System

  • Behavior Management – Extrinsic – what we say and do
  • Self-Talk & Self-Pictures – Intrinsic – what we say and believe with what we think and feel
  • Curriculum – Student Skills
  • Implementation – Staff Skills
  • Family Involvement – Family Skills
  • Observation/Evaluation

System Components Implemented

  • Congruent
  • Systemic – identify all components of the system or whole and understand the relationship between components
  • Slowly and simultaneously
  • 3-5 year process
  • The Whole is larger than the sum of the parts

Classroom Group Guidance System Checklist

    • Positive Behavior Plan
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Behavior
      3. Five Star Class Meetings
      4. Class Responsibilities and Guidelines
      5. Problem Solving – “Help” vs “Hurt”
      6. Effective Behavior Interactions
      7. Problem Ownership
      8. Cooperative Strategies
      9. Contracts
      10. Peer Group Work
      11. The Five C’s for Maintaining Conflict
      12. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      13. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Plan
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Self-Talk/Self-Pictures
      3. Activity Process General Self-Talk
      4. Activity Process Specific Self-Talk
      5. Activity Process General Self-Pictures
      6. Activity Process Specific Self-Pictures
      7. Incorporate Relaxation
      8. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      9. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Curriculum Plan
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Student Skills
      3. Begin Core Activities
      4. CANA (Children’s Affect Needs Assessment) Administered
      5. ITS (Invitational Teaching Survey) Administered
      6. Florida Key Administered
      7. CANA Pre Report
      8. ITS Pre Report
      9. Florida Key Pre Report
      10. Selective Activities
      11. Format Implemented for all Activities
      12. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      13. Post CANA, Post ITS, and Post Florida Key Tests Administered
      14. CANA, ITS, and Florida Key Post Reports
      15. Report summary written including all year-end performance Observation/Evaluation information
      16. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Staff Improvement Skills
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Staff
      3. Overview of the System
      4. Overview of Behavior Management Component
      5. Overview of Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Component
      6. Overview of Staff Implementation Skills
      7. Overview of Curriculum Component
      8. Conduct Staff Needs Assessment
      9. Prioritize Staff Skills
      10. Encouragement Strategies
      11. Prioritize Group Techniques
      12. Prioritize Other Needs Based on the ITS and Needs Assessment
      13. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      14. Increase Component Implementation Annually
    • Family Involvement
      1. Share Benchmarks, Standards, and Indicators
      2. Self Concept Series/Weave as it relates to Family
      3. Overview of the System
      4. Overview of Behavior Management Component
      5. Overview of Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Component
      6. Overview of Staff Implementation Skills
      7. Overview of Student Curriculum Component
      8. Conduct Family Needs Assessment
      9. Prioritize Skills from Behavior Management Component
      10. Prioritize Skills from Self-Talk/Self-Pictures Management Component
      11. Prioritize Skills from Staff Implementation Skills
      12. Prioritize Skills from Curricular Core and Other Skills
      13. Performance Observation/Evaluation
      14. Increase Component Implementation Annually

It is recommended that all system information be included for families when possible.

  • Developed a 3-to-5 year plan in the components for simultaneous, slow implementation
  1. Behavior Management
  2. Self-Talk/Self-Pictures
  3. Curriculum
  4. Implementation Skills
  5. Family Involvement

Suggested Counselor Time Allocations

Suggested Counselor Time Allocations

Elementary

  1. Foundation: 40%
  2. Counseling Groups: 30%
  3. Individual Counseling: 10%
  4. All Others: 20%

Middle/JR. High

  1. I. Foundation: 35-30%
  2. Counseling Groups: 30-35%
  3. Individual Counseling: 10%
  4. All Others: 25%

High School

  1. I. Foundation: 30-25%
  2. Counseling Groups: 30-35%
  3. Individual Counseling: 10%
  4. All Others: 25-35%

Traditional Classroom

Traditional Classroom

The Real Classroom

The Real Classroom

Life Lab

A way of defining the classroom as a simulation in which students, pre-K-12 and beyond, learn, experience, and apply the essential skills needed for life; the comprehensive developmental guidance system creates a life lab in every classroom through which students develop a conscious and intentional from of reference that can be applied throughout life.

Joel A. Barker, Futurist

  • School is a place that is a “life preparation center.”
  • Real live collaboration is 50% of all work in the real world.

Keynote address – Battelle for Kids Value-Added Conference, October 2006

Invitational Education Formula

The Guidance System, Staff Involvement & Professional Teams or Committees

A Conscious and Intentional Plan with the skills and processes needed for a winning invitational education program. A Life Lab of experiences needed for post-school success.

Invitational Education

Invitational Education

Invitational Education Formula

Students can develop their spirit, purpose and potential when . . .

  • there is a plan for change that is an integral part of the day-to-day operation of a school.
  • there is a conscious plan to support the self-concept development of all within a school.
  • the perception of students, staff, and families regarding school relationships, procedures, and policies is communicated and modified when it is destructive.
  • personal, social, emotional, and behavioral skills are taught.
  • students provide ongoing feedback to educators as to their day-to-day experiences in school.
  • there is an intentional process for consciously creating an inviting environment for all students.

Response To Intervention (RTI) Definition

Response To Intervention (RTI) is the practice of providing high-quality instruction and interventions matched to student need, monitoring progress frequently to make changes in instruction or goals, and applying child response data to important educational decisions.

Individual Student Triangle

80-90% ALL STUDENTS

Grow With Guidance System

+

School House

Individual Students

5-10% SOME STUDENTS

Small Groups & Individual Counseling

  • Targeted academic, personal, emotional, social, behavioral programming
  • Targeted resources • Targeted family involvement
  • Targeted staff involvement
  • Assessments to target student growth

Individual Student

1-5% INDIVIDUAL STUDENTS

Increased Individual, Family, Staff Interventions

  • Increased academic, personal, emotional, behavorial, social programming.
  • Increased targeted individual resources and counseling.
  • Assessments to target individual growth and determine options based on results and data.

Assessments

A 43-question diagnostic class climate assessment, taken by students, which gives student input about their classroom experience and whether they have a feeling of being “invited”; a diagnostic tool to involve students and get their input on ways to improve climate and school relationships; one indicator of ways to support staff growth experiences and plans; one way to observe and evaluate change at the end of a school year through pre-post assessment; the school climate assessment included in The Grow With Guidance® System.

A 42-question diagnostic curriculum assessment taken by students that provides student input into their classroom guidance curriculum activity selection; a diagnostic tool to involve students and create a sense of student ownership for guidance skill implementation and change (Note: ownership occurs when students “own” a problem and admit, recognize, and acknowledge personal needs and challenges that support assuming responsibility and commitment for change); assessment questions asked in the five essential learning strands of the curriculum of The Grow With Guidance® System; one way to observe and evaluate change at the end of the school year through pre-post assessment; the student curriculum assessment included in The Grow With Guidance® System.

Many in education, psychology, sociology, and related fields have recognized the significant relationship between selfconcept and school achievement. On the basis of available research, it now appears that students who doubt their ability to learn in school carry with them a tremendous educational handicap. The purpose of The Florida Key is to provide teachers, counselors, and related professionals with a relatively simple instrument designed to measure both inferred and professed student self-concept-as-learner. It provides teachers and related professionals insight into students’ perceptions of themselves as learners. The Florida Key identifies and measures selected student behaviors that are believed by classroom teachers to correlate with positive realistic student self-concepts in the area of school success.

1. All are important and valuable no matter what they think, say, feel, and do.

2. All show they are remembering their worth by making helpful choices toward themselves and others. They are responsible for helping not hurting self and others.

3.All are responsible for their choices. This accountability empowers all to make improvements because of their worth.

NOTE: See Podcast here.

References

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Manual. Third Edition. Revised. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-53-7 (1-878317-53-9).

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Primary Level. Third Edition. Revised. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-54-4 (1-878317-54-7).

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Intermediate Level. Third Edition. Revised. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-55-1 (1-878317-55-5).

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Middle School Level. Third Edition. Revised. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-56-8 (1-878317-56-3).

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System High School Level. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-57-5 (1-878317-57-1).

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Fun Game. Second Edition. Revised. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-49-0 (1-878317-49-0).

Radd, T. R. (2007). The Grow With Guidance® System Music: G.G. Raddbearie Sings. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-47-6 (1-878317-47-4).

Radd, T. R. (2006). The History, Development, and Research of the Educational Systems Model: The Grow With Guidance® System. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 978-1-878317-52-0 (1-878317-52-0).

Radd, T. R. (2003). Teaching and Counseling for Today’s World Pre-K–12 & Beyond. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 1-878317-48-2.

Radd, T. R. (2003). Classroom Activities for Teachers, Counselors, and Other Helping Professionals Pre-K–12 & Beyond Vols. I & II. Omaha, Nebraska: Grow With Guidance. isbn: 1-878317-45-8, 1-878317-46-6

A complete Research Report is available here.

Strong Finish – New Beginning

Strong Finish – New Beginning

Social Emotional Learning

Strong Finish-New Beginning [.pdf] 97.2KB

GWG Research Summary [.pdf] 106.5KB  This summary provides a short overview of our comprehensive research report. You can count on us to support your success! Social Emotional Learning
The History, Development, and Research of the Educational Systems Model: The Grow With Guidance System [.pdf] This comprehensive report includes 2 longitudinal studies of over ten years plus many shorter studies, both national and international.

Make a difference for your entire school community by using Grow With Guidance. Remember the impact of Grow With Guidance and Social Emotional Learning (SEL) Programs on academic achievement and other challenges we face.

The Grow With Guidance System research and other research sources are powerful tools for communicating the impact of adding GWG to your plans for next school year. We are here to assist you in your program planning and grant applications that include Grow With Guidance. You can count on us to support your success!

Strong Finish-New Beginning to find the links and information for:

  • The GWG Research Research Summary
  • Download for the 35-year GWG Research Report
  • Federal Grant Opportunity Due in May 2012
  • SEL Research Report

Strong Finish – New Beginning

The complete SEL Research Report and Federal Grant Opportunity Due in May 2012 information follows. Please keep us informed of your progress!

Social Emotional Learning Research that documents the impact on learning gains: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1467-8624.2010.01564.x/full

The Impact of Enhancing Students’ Social and Emotional Learning: A MetaAnalysis of School-Based Universal Interventions Joseph A. Durlak1 , Roger P. Weissberg2 , Allison B. Dymnicki 3 , Rebecca D. Taylor 3 , Kriston B. Schellinger 4

This article presents findings from a meta-analysis of 213 school-based, universal social and emotional learning (SEL) programs involving 270,034 kindergarten through high school students. Compared to controls, SEL participants demonstrated significantly improved social and emotional skills, attitudes, behavior, and academic performance that reflected an 11-percentilepoint gain in achievement. School teaching staff successfully conducted SEL programs. The use of four recommended practices for developing skills and the presence of implementation problems moderated program outcomes. The findings add to the growing empirical evidence regarding the positive impact of SEL programs. Policymakers, educators, and the public can contribute to healthy development of children by supporting the incorporation of evidence-based SEL programming into standard educational practice.

Federal Grant Opportunity Due in May 2012

The information needed for Grant application is:

The U.S. Department of Education is requesting applications for new fiscal year (FY) 2012 grants under the Elementary and Secondary School Counseling Program (ESSCP). The purpose of ESSCP is to support efforts by local educational agencies (LEAs) to establish or expand elementary school and secondary school counseling programs. The deadline for submitting applications is 4:30 pm eastern time on May 25, 2012.

The Federal Register announcement regarding ESSCP grant applications is at http://www.gpo.gov/fdsys/pkg/FR-2012-04-10/pdf/2012-8616.pdf. The electronic grant application should be posted soon on the http://www.grants.gov website. (According to the Federal Register notice, the ESSCP announcement can be found by clicking on “Grant Search” in the right-hand column, and entering “84.125” in the “Search by CFDA Number” box; this doesn’t appear to be working yet, however.)

Grant awards will be between $250,000-$400,000 per year, usually for three years, and the Department expects to award a total of over $21 million in grants. Grants must supplement—not supplant—other federal, state, or local funds used for providing school-based counseling and mental health services to students. Absolute priorities for the grants are to:

  1. Establish or expand counseling programs in elementary schools, secondary schools, or both; and
  2. Enable more data-based decision-making, especially in improving instructional practices, policies, and student outcomes in elementary and secondary schools.

The Federal Register notice states that when considering making awards in FY 2012 and subsequent years from the list of unfunded applicants, the Department of Education will award competitive preference priority points for

  • projects serving students residing on Indian lands;
  • projects serving students enrolled in persistently lowest-achieving schools; and
  • projects designed to address the needs of military-connected students. Projects can only seek competitive preference priority points for one priority area.

Anyone considering applying for an ESSCP grant should read the Federal Register notice; additional information on the program is at the Department of Education’s webpage at http://www.ed.gov/programs/elseccounseling/applicant.html. Grant applications can also be obtained a copy from the Education Publicans Center (EDPubs) by calling toll free 1–877–433–7827. (If you use a telecommunications device for the deaf (TDD) or a text telephone (TTY), call 1–877–576–7734. (If contacting ED Pubs, be sure to identify the program by CFDA number 84.215E.)

For more information, contact:

American Counseling Association (ACA) Scott Barstow | Director, Public Policy and Legislation ph 703-823-9800 x234 | 800-347-6647 x234fx 703-823-0252 | web counseling.org

 

Strong Finish – New Beginning [Social Emotional Learning]